How has cardiovascular disease contributed to the rural–urban life expectancy gap?

Leah Abrams

In the United States, rural residents do not live as long as their urban counterparts. This disparity has been widening for decades. Around 1970, urban life expectancy was 70.9 years, compared with 70.5 in rural areas, but by 2005–2009, the difference was greater (78.8 versus 76.8 years). In our research recently published in the IJE, we found that the gap in life expectancy would be even wider today if declines in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality had not dramatically slowed around 2010.

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“Not-so-good-anymore” cholesterol linked to vision loss in the elderly

Joe Maranville, Qiao Fan, Tien Yin Wong, ChingYu Chen and Heiko Runz

Maranville authors

Only a few years ago, doctors would advise their patients that elevated blood levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), then termed the “good cholesterol”, were beneficial and would protect them against coronary heart disease. This belief has been called into question, however, as neither genetics nor clinical trials could demonstrate that raising HDL-C levels would protect against cardiovascular disease. Our study, published recently in the IJE, casts further doubt on this “not-so-good-anymore” cholesterol by showing that genetic variants that cause higher HDL-C levels also increase the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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